A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a nonprogrammed, operant treatment for school-age children who stutter. The treatment was administered by clinicians and parents to 11 children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. A median of 12 one-hour treatment sessions was required to achieve ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1996
A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michelle Lincoln
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Mark Onslow
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Christine Lewis
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Linda Wilson
    The University of Sydney, Australia
  • Contact author: Michelle A. Lincoln, School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW, 2141
    Contact author: Michelle A. Lincoln, School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, NSW, 2141×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: M.Lincoln@cchs.su.edu.au
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1996
A Clinical Trial of an Operant Treatment for School-Age Children Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 73-85. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.73
History: Received November 28, 1994 , Accepted June 14, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 73-85. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.73
History: Received November 28, 1994; Accepted June 14, 1995

The purpose of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of a nonprogrammed, operant treatment for school-age children who stutter. The treatment was administered by clinicians and parents to 11 children between the ages of 7 and 12 years. A median of 12 one-hour treatment sessions was required to achieve less than 1.5% syllables stuttered during within-clinic and beyond-clinic speaking situations. The children’s speech was assessed in three everyday speaking situations over a 12-month post-treatment period. All children maintained decreased stuttering rates at 12 months post-treatment. In addition, surveys found that parents were “satisfied” or “very satisfied” with their children’s speech post-treatment. These results suggest that a nonprogrammed operant treatment for stuttering may be effective with school-age children who stutter.

Acknowledgments
This research was partially supported by Cumberland College Research Grant CCHEEC 90/49. The authors would like to thank Kathy Bryant for her assistance in this study and Vicki Reed for her review of an early draft of this paper.
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