Clinical Implications of the Natural History of Slow Expressive Language Development One of the most puzzling problems confronting speech-language pathologists is the child who, at age 2, appears normal in every way, but fails to begin talking. We’ve known for some time that children with learning disabilities frequently have histories of slow language growth (Catts & Kamhi, 1986; Maxwell & ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   May 01, 1996
Clinical Implications of the Natural History of Slow Expressive Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rhea Paul
    Portland State University, Portland, OR
  • Contact author: R. Paul, PhD, Department of Speech, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207
    Contact author: R. Paul, PhD, Department of Speech, Portland State University, P.O. Box 751, Portland, OR 97207×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: rhea@nh1.nh.pdx.edu
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   May 01, 1996
Clinical Implications of the Natural History of Slow Expressive Language Development
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 5-21. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.05
History: Received December 13, 1994 , Accepted December 1, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 5-21. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.05
History: Received December 13, 1994; Accepted December 1, 1995
Acknowledgments
The research reported here was supported by grants from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (DC00793), the Meyer Memorial Trust, the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation, and Portland State University. I would like to thank my research assistants Kathy Belfiore, Cathy Laszlo, Rita Hernandez, Lisa Herron, Karen Johnson, and Anne Cole for their assistance in collecting the data. I also want to express appreciation to Ellen Reuler for her critical reading of early versions of this paper. I am indebted to Donna Thal for her thoughtful critique of my original submission to AJSLP, as well as for her generous advice on elaborating the “watch and see” policy suggestions. Marc Fey was also a great help in thinking through these issues and preparing the final version of this paper. Portions of this paper were presented at the National Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association.
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