Children With Slow Expressive Language Development What Is the Forecast for School Achievement? Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   May 01, 1996
Children With Slow Expressive Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Ilsa E. Schwarz
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Contact Author: Marilyn A. Nippold, PhD, Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403
    Contact Author: Marilyn A. Nippold, PhD, Communication Disorders & Sciences, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: nippold@oregon.uoregon.edu
Article Information
Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   May 01, 1996
Children With Slow Expressive Language Development
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 22-25. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.22
History: Received August 15, 1995 , Accepted January 16, 1996
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 22-25. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.22
History: Received August 15, 1995; Accepted January 16, 1996
Rhea Paul’s provocative article, entitled “Clinical Implications of the Natural History of Slow Expressive Language Development,” is a significant contribution to the literature on late-talking children. It expands the database in this area, stimulates thought about critical issues of language assessment and intervention, and raises important topics for future research. Although our reaction to the article is generally favorable, some concerns arise as we consider the implications and recommendations. Because Paul’s article has the potential to influence clinical practice and public policy in speech-language pathology, we feel it is important to explicate our concerns.
First, in drawing implications from her study, Paul asks, “will the linguistic weakness that presents as SELD in young children result in significant educational handicap?” (p. 13). Her response to this question is, “Based on my data [i.e., those collected in her own study], and those of studies of similar children, the answer would appear to be: not in the first few grades” (p. 13). In contrast, our response is that there is not enough evidence to answer this question.
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