Inside One of the most important concerns for speech-language pathologists today is the influence of cultural and linguistic characteristics on clinical practice. Our need to assess and provide intervention to individuals from cultures other than our own is perhaps the strongest single force motivating our interest in cultural and linguistic ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 1996
Inside
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 1996
Inside
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.02
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1996, Vol. 5, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0502.02
One of the most important concerns for speech-language pathologists today is the influence of cultural and linguistic characteristics on clinical practice. Our need to assess and provide intervention to individuals from cultures other than our own is perhaps the strongest single force motivating our interest in cultural and linguistic diversity. But I believe there are other critical reasons for studying other cultures and languages and the ways in which cultural and linguistic differences influence what speech-language pathologists do. In fact, it seems to me that we cannot develop adequate theories of speech and language disorders or speech and language intervention unless we embrace an international perspective that takes into careful consideration the similarities and differences among cultures and languages across the world.
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