Effects of Pictures Versus Orally Presented Stories on Story Retellings by Children With Language Impairment Narratives can be a useful clinical assessment tool, but some thought must be given to the type of stimuli used to elicit them. For the current study, children with language impairments (ages 5;7–9;9) told stories from pictures, retold orally presented stories, and retold stories presented both orally and pictorially. Within-subjects ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
Effects of Pictures Versus Orally Presented Stories on Story Retellings by Children With Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Phyllis Schneider
    University of Alberta, Edmonton
  • Contact author: Phyllis Schneider, Dept. of Speech Pathology and Audiology, University of Alberta, 2-70 Corbett Hall, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2G4, Canada. E-mail: phyllis.schneider@ualberta.ca
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
Effects of Pictures Versus Orally Presented Stories on Story Retellings by Children With Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 86-96. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.86
History: Received January 25, 1994 , Accepted May 19, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 86-96. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.86
History: Received January 25, 1994; Accepted May 19, 1995

Narratives can be a useful clinical assessment tool, but some thought must be given to the type of stimuli used to elicit them. For the current study, children with language impairments (ages 5;7–9;9) told stories from pictures, retold orally presented stories, and retold stories presented both orally and pictorially. Within-subjects comparisons showed that the best stories (in terms of complete episodes and number of information units) were produced when children listened to stories without pictures. The stories containing the least story grammar information and the greatest extraneous information, but with the fewest indicators of formulation load (mazes), were produced when children viewed the pictures without hearing an oral version. Implications for choice of narrative stimuli are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Funding for this research was provided by the Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital, Edmonton. I am extremely grateful to Kerrie Pain, Gary Holdgrafer, Nickola Nelson, and several anonymous reviewers for their comments on the study; to Grazia Dicker and Linda Spooner for their assistance in identifying children for the study and greatly facilitating the data collection process, and to Liz Webster and Connie Alton for providing information on the Glenrose School. I would also like to thank Ellen Bailey and Nancy Duncan for their assistance in data collection, as well as the children who participated in the study for their cheerful and enthusiastic participation.
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