Effects of Phonological Decoding Training on Children's Word Recognition of CVC, CV, and VC Structures The effects of training in letter-sound correspondences and phonemic decoding (segmenting and blending skills) on three kindergartners' word recognition abilities were examined using a single-subject multiple-baseline design across behaviors and subjects. Whereas CVC pseudowords were trained, generalization to untrained CVC pseudowords, untrained CVC real words, untrained CV and VC pseudowords, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1996
Effects of Phonological Decoding Training on Children's Word Recognition of CVC, CV, and VC Structures
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenyatta O. Rivers
    University of Central Florida, Orlando
  • Linda J. Lombardino
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Cynthia K. Thompson
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: L. J. Lombardino, PhD, Department of Communication Processes and Disorders, 464 Dauer Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611. E-Mail: llombard@cpd.ufl.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1996
Effects of Phonological Decoding Training on Children's Word Recognition of CVC, CV, and VC Structures
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 67-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.67
History: Received August 11, 1994 , Accepted June 14, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 67-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.67
History: Received August 11, 1994; Accepted June 14, 1995

The effects of training in letter-sound correspondences and phonemic decoding (segmenting and blending skills) on three kindergartners' word recognition abilities were examined using a single-subject multiple-baseline design across behaviors and subjects. Whereas CVC pseudowords were trained, generalization to untrained CVC pseudowords, untrained CVC real words, untrained CV and VC pseudowords, and untrained CV and VC real words were assessed. Generalization occurred to all of the untrained constructions for two of the three subjects. The third subject did not show the same degree of generalization to VC pseudowords and real words; however, after three training sessions, this subject read all VC constructions with 100% accuracy. Findings are consistent with group training studies that have shown the benefits of decoding training on word recognition and spelling skills and with studies that have demonstrated the effects of generalization to less complex structures when more complex structures are trained.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge Alonzo Young, Vicki Young, the Family Worship Center and Academy staff, and Laurie Mercado for their contributions to this project.
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