Effect of a Tongue-Holding Maneuver on Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement During Deglutition Effects of a tongue-holding maneuver on anterior bulging of the posterior pharyngeal wall (PPW) during swallowing were investigated in 10 young adult normal subjects. Videofluorographic images of 3-ml liquid barium swallows were digitized to quantify the extent of anterior bulge of the PPW with and without the maneuver at the ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 1996
Effect of a Tongue-Holding Maneuver on Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement During Deglutition
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Masako Fujiu
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Contact author: Jeri A. Logemann, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3540
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 1996
Effect of a Tongue-Holding Maneuver on Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement During Deglutition
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 23-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.23
History: Received April 18, 1994 , Accepted June 19, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1996, Vol. 5, 23-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0501.23
History: Received April 18, 1994; Accepted June 19, 1995

Effects of a tongue-holding maneuver on anterior bulging of the posterior pharyngeal wall (PPW) during swallowing were investigated in 10 young adult normal subjects. Videofluorographic images of 3-ml liquid barium swallows were digitized to quantify the extent of anterior bulge of the PPW with and without the maneuver at the mid and the inferior levels of the second cervical vertebra. A significant increase in PPW bulging was seen with the maneuver at both pharyngeal levels. These findings indicate potential for developing new treatment techniques to facilitate compensatory anterior movement of the PPW, which has not been a target for direct treatment in the past. At present, the tongue-holding maneuver can be employed clinically as an easy method for testing the compliance of the PPW videofluorographically. However, the use of the maneuver per se, which inhibits posterior retraction of the base of tongue (BOT), resulted in increasing the pharyngeal (specifically vallecular) residue after the swallow. The results also indicate the importance of tongue movement in triggering the pharyngeal swallow.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to express gratitude to Barbara Roa Pauloski, Cathy Lazarus, and Joan C. Fox for their assistance in data collection and analyses. This research was supported by National Institute of Health Grants PO1-CA40007-09 and R01-NS28525-03.
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