Syntax Stimulation Revisited An Analysis of Generalization of Treatment Effects Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Syntax Stimulation Revisited
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ruth B. Fink
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA
  • Myrna F. Schwartz
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Elizabeth Rochon
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Jessica L. Myers
    Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, Philadelphia, PA
  • Gail Simon Socolof
    Winifred Masterson Burke Medical Research Institute, White Plains, NY
  • Ruth Bluestone
    Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Contact author: Ruth B. Fink, Moss Rehabilitation Research Institute, 1200 West Tabor Road, Philadelphia, PA 19141.
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Syntax Stimulation Revisited
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 99-104. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.99
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 99-104. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.99

A multiple-probes variant of the multiple-baseline across-behaviors design was used to study the extent of generalization associated with syntax stimulation (SS) training. To assess whether acquisition of specific structures generalized across tasks, we used a specially designed sentence elicitation probe, Picture Description with Structure Modeling (PDSM; Fink et al., 1994). To assess whether training enhanced morphosyntactic production in connected speech, we used the coding scheme developed by Saffran, Berndt, and Schwartz (1989) . Four subjects with chronic nonfluent aphasia were trained to produce active, passive, and embedded sentences using materials and procedures from the Helm Elicited Language Program for Syntax Stimulation (Helm-Estabrooks, 1981). These sentence structures were trained in successive phases with generalization probes administered before and after each phase. Three subjects with aphasia served as controls. Strong within-task generalization was observed and, in contrast to previous studies, generalization to the novel sentence elicitation task (PDSM). SS training did not yield measurable gains in narrative production.

Author Note
This study was supported by grant RO1 DC01825 from NIDCD. The authors thank Gwen Dorfman and Paula Sobel for their assistance with data collection and analysis and Cynthia Thompson for her valuable input.
Elizabeth Rochon is now at the Department of Communication Disorders, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.
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