Applying Basic Neuroscience to Aphasia Therapy What the Animals Are Telling Us Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Applying Basic Neuroscience to Aphasia Therapy
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kristen A. Keefe
    National Institutes of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD
  • Contact author: Kristen A. Keefe, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, 112 Skaggs Hall, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Applying Basic Neuroscience to Aphasia Therapy
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 88-93. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.88
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 88-93. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.88

Advances in basic neuroscience have increased our knowledge about the neural processes underlying learning and memory and the cortical reorganization that occurs in response to environmental demands and cortical injury. This article provides a selective review of published studies conducted in animals that examine functional and structural substrates of neural plasticity in the adult mammalian brain, and discusses the implications of this knowledge for aphasia therapy. The processes and constraints identified in the studies reviewed can be used to refine and justify current aphasia therapies, as well as to design additional behavioral interventions.

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