The Preschool Speech Intelligibility Measure Documenting changes in speech intelligibility across time is an important but difficult task for speech-language pathologists. This study reports on the development and initial testing of the Preschool Speech Intelligibility Measure (PSIM), a single-word, multiple-choice intelligibility measure. The PSIM is adapted from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   November 01, 1995
The Preschool Speech Intelligibility Measure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sherrill R. Morris
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Kim A. Wilcox
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Tracy L. Schooling
    Chesapeake Center, Inc., Alexandria, VA
  • Contact author: Sherrill R. Morris, Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, 3031 Dole, University of Kansas, Lawrence, KS 66045
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   November 01, 1995
The Preschool Speech Intelligibility Measure
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 22-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.22
History: Received July 25, 1994 , Accepted May 10, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 22-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.22
History: Received July 25, 1994; Accepted May 10, 1995

Documenting changes in speech intelligibility across time is an important but difficult task for speech-language pathologists. This study reports on the development and initial testing of the Preschool Speech Intelligibility Measure (PSIM), a single-word, multiple-choice intelligibility measure. The PSIM is adapted from the Assessment of Intelligibility of Dysarthric Speech (Yorkston & Beukelman, 1981) and is designed to plot changes in children's speech intelligibility across time. This instrument is offered as an addition to the existing array of available speech intelligibility measures.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Betty Bunce, Angela Rodakavich, and Jennifer DeVault for their assistance in data collection and analysis. Additionally, we thank Kathy Siren and Mabel Rice for their insightful contributions during the initial development of this measure and Peter Flipsen, Jr. and Audrey Weston for their comments on an earlier version of this paper. We are also grateful to the children and listeners who participated in this study. This work was supported by NIH grant # HO29D90046 and KECRI grant # HO24U80001.
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