Acoustic Analysis of Accurate Word Stress Patterning in Patients With Apraxia of Speech and Broca's Aphasia Stress-marking strategies employed by subjects with apraxia of speech were compared to those of matched normal controls, for real disyllabic words produced in isolation and in sentences, across acoustic variables of fundamental frequency, syllable duration, and vocal intensity. Heterogeneity of stress marking in terms of acoustic trading relationships was observed ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Acoustic Analysis of Accurate Word Stress Patterning in Patients With Apraxia of Speech and Broca's Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas P. Marquardt
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Georgia Duffy
    The University of Texas at Austin
  • Michael P. Cannito
    The University of Memphis, TN
  • Contact author: Michael P. Cannito, PhD, School of Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology, The University of Memphis, 807 Jefferson Avenue, Memphis, Tennessee 38105
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Apraxia of Speech & Childhood Apraxia of Speech / Voice Disorders / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Acoustic Analysis of Accurate Word Stress Patterning in Patients With Apraxia of Speech and Broca's Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 180-185. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.180
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 180-185. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.180

Stress-marking strategies employed by subjects with apraxia of speech were compared to those of matched normal controls, for real disyllabic words produced in isolation and in sentences, across acoustic variables of fundamental frequency, syllable duration, and vocal intensity. Heterogeneity of stress marking in terms of acoustic trading relationships was observed in both the apraxic and normal subjects. Strategies varied depending on whether words were produced in isolation or in sentences, and whether the first or second syllable was stressed. Allowing for marked durational increases in apraxia, there were negligible differences in stress marking between groups. However, some idiosyncratic strategies and a tendency toward reduced durational contrast between stressed and unstressed syllables were observed.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access