Ability of Subjects With Aphasia to Visually Analyze Written Language, Pantomime, and Iconographic Symbols Considerable debate exists regarding aphasia and its relationship to deficits observed in the ability to analyze visual stimuli. In this investigation, the ability of patients with aphasia to comprehend various types of visual stimuli was compared to that of subjects with no known neurological impairment. The types of visual stimuli ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Ability of Subjects With Aphasia to Visually Analyze Written Language, Pantomime, and Iconographic Symbols
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura Thorburn
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Marilyn Newhoff
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Scott S. Rubin
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Contact author: Marilyn Newhoff, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 576 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Ability of Subjects With Aphasia to Visually Analyze Written Language, Pantomime, and Iconographic Symbols
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 174-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.174
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 174-179. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.174

Considerable debate exists regarding aphasia and its relationship to deficits observed in the ability to analyze visual stimuli. In this investigation, the ability of patients with aphasia to comprehend various types of visual stimuli was compared to that of subjects with no known neurological impairment. The types of visual stimuli of interest were: written language, pantomime, and iconographic symbols. Results indicated that individuals with aphasia, in comparison to the controls, demonstrated inferior performance on their comprehension of pantomime and written language. However, for iconographs, patients with aphasia performed comparably to the controls. Directions for future research are discussed.

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