Lexical Retrieval Behaviors of Subjects With Aphasia and Subjects Without Brain Damage on a Rebus Riddle Task This study compared the lexical retrieval behaviors of subjects with aphasia (APH) and subjects with no brain damage (NBD) on a Rebus Riddle task. Most differences between the groups were quantitative. APH subjects solved significantly fewer riddles (49%) than the NBD subjects (82%); their riddle-solving times were significantly longer (M=27.47 ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Lexical Retrieval Behaviors of Subjects With Aphasia and Subjects Without Brain Damage on a Rebus Riddle Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert C. Marshall
    University of Rhode Island, Kingston
  • Donald B. Freed
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Contact author: Robert C. Marshall, University of Rhode Island, Department of Communicative Disorders, Adams Hall, Kingston, RI 02881
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Lexical Retrieval Behaviors of Subjects With Aphasia and Subjects Without Brain Damage on a Rebus Riddle Task
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 164-168. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.164
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 164-168. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.164

This study compared the lexical retrieval behaviors of subjects with aphasia (APH) and subjects with no brain damage (NBD) on a Rebus Riddle task. Most differences between the groups were quantitative. APH subjects solved significantly fewer riddles (49%) than the NBD subjects (82%); their riddle-solving times were significantly longer (M=27.47 seconds) than those of the NBD group (M=8.86 seconds). Riddle-solving time differences resulted from relative absence of behaviors in the correct responses of the NBD group (73%) compared to the APH group (23%). Qualitative analyses revealed similar distributions of lexical retrieval behaviors across the correct responses, cuing successes, and cuing failures for both groups. The Rebus Riddle task was sufficiently difficult to evoke lexical retrieval behaviors by NBD subjects. APH subjects' riddle-solving efforts demonstrated an increase in the frequency of these behaviors, but the types of lexical retrieval behaviors exhibited by both groups were similar.

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