Self-Monitoring Abilities of Two Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury During Verbal Learning Adult survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often display learning and executive function deficits. In this study, two adults with TBI and two control subjects were required to self-monitor their learning by making "judgment-of-learning" (JOL) predictions about future recall. Control subjects were highly accurate when predictions were delayed from the ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Self-Monitoring Abilities of Two Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury During Verbal Learning
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary R. T. Kennedy
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Margaret Rogers
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Mary Kennedy, MA, Rehabilitation Medicine, Box 356490, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-6490
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Self-Monitoring Abilities of Two Adults With Traumatic Brain Injury During Verbal Learning
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 159-163. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.159
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 159-163. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.159

Adult survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often display learning and executive function deficits. In this study, two adults with TBI and two control subjects were required to self-monitor their learning by making "judgment-of-learning" (JOL) predictions about future recall. Control subjects were highly accurate when predictions were delayed from the learning episode, but not as accurate when predictions were made immediately following learning. Delayed monitoring accuracy of subjects with TBI was the same as their immediate monitoring accuracy. One subject overpredicted his recall ability, whereas the other displayed poor relative predictive accuracy. Proportions of recall, predictions of recall, and correlations between recall and predictions were necessary in order to identify the different types of monitoring difficulty demonstrated by these subjects with TBI.

Acknowledgments
This study was completed as part of a dissertation project by the first author. The authors wish to thank Tom Nelson, Department of Psychology, University of Washington, for his expertise and thoughtful comments throughout this project.
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