Language Intervention With a Child With Hearing Whose Parents Are Deaf Literature concerning language acquisition in hearing children of deaf parents provides clinicians with a variety of case studies. Some of these studies found that language acquisition progressed in both sign language and spoken language without delay or disorder; others indicate concerns, especially in the development of spoken language. This case ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   November 01, 1995
Language Intervention With a Child With Hearing Whose Parents Are Deaf
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda C. Seal
    James Madison University
  • Lisa A. Hammett
    Augusta County Schools
  • Contact author: Brenda C. Seal, PhD, Associate Professor, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, James Madison University, Harrisonburg, VA 22807.
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Language Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   November 01, 1995
Language Intervention With a Child With Hearing Whose Parents Are Deaf
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 15-21. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.15
History: Received June 13, 1994 , Accepted March 22, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 15-21. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.15
History: Received June 13, 1994; Accepted March 22, 1995

Literature concerning language acquisition in hearing children of deaf parents provides clinicians with a variety of case studies. Some of these studies found that language acquisition progressed in both sign language and spoken language without delay or disorder; others indicate concerns, especially in the development of spoken language. This case study describes an intervention program with a 20-month-old hearing child whose parents are deaf. The child was diagnosed as having a significant delay in both spoken and sign language. The home-based intervention program is described and the results are discussed, with implications for similar programming.

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