Effect of Generating a Semantic Prime The Impact of Age and Cognitive Impairment Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Effect of Generating a Semantic Prime
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Amy Hasselkus
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Scott S. Rubin
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Marilyn Newhoff
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Contact author: Marilyn Newhoff, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 545 Aderhold Hall, The University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Effect of Generating a Semantic Prime
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 148-151. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.148
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 148-151. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.148

Studies of both semantic priming and the generation effect (GE) have implicated spreading activation in semantic memory and have provided evidence for a semantic memory access disorder in patients with dementia. Fifteen subjects consisting of young, elderly, and demented patients participated in a semantic priming/GE task to determine whether the act of generating a semantic prime enhanced activation and reduced reaction times to related items. Reaction times were recorded for semantically related and unrelated targets presented after either read or generated word pair cues. From the results it was suggested that generating a prime provided little benefit for young subjects or subjects with dementia; elderly subjects benefited more from generating information than from reading it. Implications for theories of dementia and normal aging are discussed.

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