Sense of Effort During a Lexical Decision Task Resource Allocation Deficits Following Brain Damage Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Sense of Effort During a Lexical Decision Task
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather M. Clark
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Iowa City The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Donald A. Robin
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and National Center for Voice and Speech, The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Contact author: Heather M. Clark, MS, Audiol-ogy and Speech Pathology Service 126, VA Medical Center, Iowa City, IA 52246
Article Information
Normal Language Processing / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Sense of Effort During a Lexical Decision Task
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 143-147. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.143
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 143-147. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.143

Individuals’ perception of task difficulty (sense of effort) is thought to reflect resource requirements. As task complexity increases, more resources are allocated to a task, and greater effort is experienced. We investigated resource allocation in subjects with brain damage by examining sense of effort during a lexical decision task. Although subjects with no brain damage demonstrate strong relationships among task complexity, reaction time, and effort (Clark & Robin, 1994), consistent relationships were not always observed for subjects with a history of cerebrovascular accident or traumatic brain injury. These data suggest that subjects with brain damage may not be sensitive to task complexity and may require external cues to effectively allocate resources.

Acknowledgments
We thank Joe Duffy and Connie Tompkins for their feedback on an earlier version of this paper. We also thank Marilyn Newhoff for her feedback and editorial assistance. This research was supported by NIH NINDS Program Project Grant PO NS 19632.
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