Features of Spontaneous Language in Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Dysarthria Language samples (picture description) produced by moderately dysarthric speakers with ALS were compared with those of gender- and age-matched controls. Results indicated that dysarthric speakers produced the same number of concepts but fewer words than controls. Efficiency (as measured by content units/minute and words/content unit) was maintained in the dysarthria ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Features of Spontaneous Language in Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Dysarthria
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Constance Wilkinson
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Kathryn M. Yorkston
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Edythe A. Strand
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Margaret Rogers
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Constance Wilkinson, c/o Kathryn Yorkston, PhD, Rehabilitation Medicine, Box 356490, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-6490
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Features of Spontaneous Language in Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis and Dysarthria
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 139-142. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.139
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 139-142. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.139

Language samples (picture description) produced by moderately dysarthric speakers with ALS were compared with those of gender- and age-matched controls. Results indicated that dysarthric speakers produced the same number of concepts but fewer words than controls. Efficiency (as measured by content units/minute and words/content unit) was maintained in the dysarthria group by shortening phrases, reducing the proportion of mazes, and increasing the number of nongrammatical phrases. Measures of vocabulary were not different for the two groups. Three possible explanations for the "economy of wording" strategy are: (a) response to increasingly effortful speech, (b) subtle language deficits, and (c) response to slowed speaking rates.

Acknowledgments
This project was completed as part of a master’s thesis by the first author. Preparation of this work was also supported in part by NIDCD grant 1K08 DC00043-01A1.
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