Confrontation Naming and the Provision of Superordinate, Coordinate, and Other Semantic Information By Individuals With Aphasia Thirty-three individuals with aphasia (11 Broca's, 11 conduction, and 11 anomic) and 11 healthy control subjects were studied using a confrontation naming task. Each naming trial was followed by requests for the superordinate, other semantic information, and an in-class coordinate. All groups were as successful at giving semantic and coordinate ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
Confrontation Naming and the Provision of Superordinate, Coordinate, and Other Semantic Information By Individuals With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Pelagie M. Beeson
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Audrey L. Holland
    National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Laura L. Murray
    Indiana University, Bloomington
  • Contact author: Pelagie M. Beeson, PhD, National Center for Neurogenic Communication Disorders, Building 71, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
Confrontation Naming and the Provision of Superordinate, Coordinate, and Other Semantic Information By Individuals With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 135-138. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.135
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 135-138. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.135

Thirty-three individuals with aphasia (11 Broca's, 11 conduction, and 11 anomic) and 11 healthy control subjects were studied using a confrontation naming task. Each naming trial was followed by requests for the superordinate, other semantic information, and an in-class coordinate. All groups were as successful at giving semantic and coordinate information about items as they were at giving the basic level names for the items. Giving the superordinate category was the most difficult task for individuals with aphasia, regardless of type. These results suggest that in the face of anomia for basic level name, the provision of semantic information or an in-class coordinate is likely to be a better compensatory strategy than trying to provide the superordinate category.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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