The Efficacy of a Semantic Cueing Procedure on Naming Performance of Adults With Aphasia The effects of self-selected semantic cues on naming performance of three individuals with aphasia were studied. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline design, a procedure incorporating semantic feature analysis was used to facilitate generalization. Two subjects showed improved naming performance on trained items, with robust generalization to untrained items and maintenance over ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
The Efficacy of a Semantic Cueing Procedure on Naming Performance of Adults With Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Soren Lowell
    Carondelet St. Mary's Hospital, Tucson, AZ
  • Pelagie M. Beeson
    University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
  • Audrey L. Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
  • Contact author: Soren Lowell, 4528 N. Via Entrada, Apt. 37, Tucson, AZ 85718
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
The Efficacy of a Semantic Cueing Procedure on Naming Performance of Adults With Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 109-114. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.109
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 109-114. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.109

The effects of self-selected semantic cues on naming performance of three individuals with aphasia were studied. Using a single-subject multiple-baseline design, a procedure incorporating semantic feature analysis was used to facilitate generalization. Two subjects showed improved naming performance on trained items, with robust generalization to untrained items and maintenance over a one-week period. Performance remained stable on a control measure of productive morphology throughout training, indicating that improved naming performance was not due to generalized language improvement. The third subject did not show substantial improvement. For the two subjects who improved, results suggest that they learned a semantic cueing strategy and applied it to both trained and untrained items for improved naming performance.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported, in part, by National Multipurpose Research and Training Grant DC01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders. Special thanks to Richard F. Curlee for his insight regarding research design, his editorial feedback, and his commitment to graduate students.
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