The Effect of Personalized Cueing on Long-Term Naming of Realistic Visual Stimuli Associative learning techniques have been used successfully to teach word pair lists to subjects with brain damage. However, these techniques have not been used systematically to improve naming of complex visual stimuli such as might be found in aphasia therapy. This study examined the effect of an associative learning procedure, ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   November 01, 1995
The Effect of Personalized Cueing on Long-Term Naming of Realistic Visual Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Donald B. Freed
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Robert C. Marshall
    University of Rhode Island, Kingston
  • Contact author: Don Freed, PhD, Speech Pathology and Audiology (126-P), Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 3710 Southwest U.S. Veterans Hospital Road, Portland, OR 97207
Article Information
Language Disorders / Aphasia / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Supplement: Clinical Aphasiology Conference Supplement
Supplement Article   |   November 01, 1995
The Effect of Personalized Cueing on Long-Term Naming of Realistic Visual Stimuli
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 105-108. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.105
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 1995, Vol. 4, 105-108. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0404.105

Associative learning techniques have been used successfully to teach word pair lists to subjects with brain damage. However, these techniques have not been used systematically to improve naming of complex visual stimuli such as might be found in aphasia therapy. This study examined the effect of an associative learning procedure, personalized cueing, on long-term naming of 40 realistic stimuli by 10 subjects with aphasia and 10 subjects without brain damage. The results showed that subjects without brain damage had significantly higher levels of naming accuracy than subjects with aphasia; however, subjects with aphasia were able to recall approximately 50% of the trained stimuli on both the 1-week and 30-day post-training probes. These results show that subjects with aphasia are able to use personalized cueing to learn effectively the names of items pictured in realistic visual stimuli and that the effects of training can be durable over time.

Acknowledgment
This research was supported by the Office of Rehabilitation Research and Development, Department of Veterans Affairs.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access