The Role of Repetition Units in the Differential Diagnosis of Early Childhood Incipient Stuttering The role of the number of repetition units as a differentiating factor in the identification of very early stuttering in young children is explored. Speech samples of 1,000 syllables each from 29 experimental and 29 control subjects were analyzed for presence and extent of part-word and single syllable word repetitions. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 1995
The Role of Repetition Units in the Differential Diagnosis of Early Childhood Incipient Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nicoline Grinager Ambrose
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
  • Ehud Yairi
    University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign
  • Contact author: Nicoline Ambrose, University of Illinois, 901 South Sixth Street, Champaign, IL 61820
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 1995
The Role of Repetition Units in the Differential Diagnosis of Early Childhood Incipient Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 82-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.82
History: Received June 13, 1994 , Accepted November 11, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 82-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.82
History: Received June 13, 1994; Accepted November 11, 1994

The role of the number of repetition units as a differentiating factor in the identification of very early stuttering in young children is explored. Speech samples of 1,000 syllables each from 29 experimental and 29 control subjects were analyzed for presence and extent of part-word and single syllable word repetitions. Statistically significant differences between the two groups were found for the mean number of units per instance of repetition, the percentages of single- and multiple-unit repetitions, and the frequency of occurrence of instances containing multiple repetition units. The extent of overlap between groups varied among the three measures. Specific suggestions concerning applications of the findings to clinical purposes are made.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by grant #R01 DC00459 from the National Institute of Deafness and Other Communication Disorders; principal investigator, Ehud Yairi.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access