Reliability of Clinician Judgments of Severity of Phonological Impairment Pairs of speech-language pathologists independently rated severity of phonological impairment for 45 preschoolers, aged 30 to 65 months. Children were rated along a continuum from normal to profound. In addition to judging overall severity of impairment, the clinicians provided separate ratings based on citation form and conversational samples. A judgment ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1995
Reliability of Clinician Judgments of Severity of Phonological Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan K. Rafaat
    Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Susan Rvachew
    Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Rebecca S. C. Russell
    Alberta Children's Hospital, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Contact author: Susan K. Rafaat, Alberta Children’s Hospital, Speech-Language Pathology, 1820 Richmond Road SW, Calgary AB, Canada T2T-5C7
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1995
Reliability of Clinician Judgments of Severity of Phonological Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 39-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.39
History: Received April 19, 1994 , Accepted February 13, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 39-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.39
History: Received April 19, 1994; Accepted February 13, 1995

Pairs of speech-language pathologists independently rated severity of phonological impairment for 45 preschoolers, aged 30 to 65 months. Children were rated along a continuum from normal to profound. In addition to judging overall severity of impairment, the clinicians provided separate ratings based on citation form and conversational samples. A judgment of intelligibility of conversational speech was also required. Results indicated that interclinician reliability was adequate (80% agreement) for older preschool-aged children (4-1/2 years and above) but that judgments by speechlanguage pathologists were not sufficiently reliable for children under 3-1/2 years of age 40% agreement). Children judged to have age appropriate phonological abilities were not clearly distinguishable from children judged to have a mild delay. Educating speech-language pathologists regarding the normative phonological data that are available with respect to young preschoolers, and ensuring that such data are readily accessible for assessment purposes, is required.

Acknowledgments
The authors acknowledge the Speech-Language Pathology Section of the Department of Rehabilitation Resources, most particularly those speech-language pathologists who participated in the data collection for this manuscript.
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