Modified Teaching Clinic Peer Group Supervision in Clinical Training and Professional Development Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   August 01, 1995
Modified Teaching Clinic
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • A. Lynn Williams
    Oklahoma State University, Stillwater
  • Contact author: A. Lynn Williams, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, East Tennessee State University, Box 70643, Johnson City, TN 37614
  • Author is now affiliated with East Tennessee State University.
    Author is now affiliated with East Tennessee State University.×
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   August 01, 1995
Modified Teaching Clinic
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 29-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.29
History: Received January 31, 1994 , Accepted November 14, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 29-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.29
History: Received January 31, 1994; Accepted November 14, 1994

A peer group model of supervision is presented as an alternative to the conventional one-on-one model of clinical supervision. A modified version of Dowling’s (1979)  Teaching Clinic is described as a model whose format appears to exemplify the tenets of the clinical supervisory model (Anderson, 1988; Cogan, 1973) through the promotion of collegiality and the development of self-supervisory skills among the participating clinicians. The Modified Teaching Clinic (MTC) addresses issues of group process, fosters the advancement of clinicians along a continuum of supervision, and facilitates professional growth and development. Although peer group supervision is frequently used in the growth and development of professionals in other fields such as counseling, there are currently no models that have been described for the continued development of speech-language pathologists and audiologists in various service delivery settings. The need for continued professional interaction and peer group supervision is addressed by the MTC via its applicability in various clinical settings.

Acknowledgments
This paper reflects the considerable input and influence of many thoughtful discussions with James Robert Bitter. His insightful comments shaped my thinking about clinical supervision, group process, and students’ ways of “knowing” and “learning.” The MTC has also been shaped over the years by the students who were participants in the peer supervision groups and by my supervision colleagues. This paper was strengthened by the thoughtful reviews and comments provided by Jean Anderson, Julie Masterson, and the two anonymous reviewers. Portions of this paper were presented at the 1990 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Seattle, and the 1991 California Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention, Long Beach.
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