Inside In Zimbabwe, as you will read in this issue’s World View article, there are only about 20 speech-language pathologists to provide intervention services to over 10 million people. There is no educational program in our discipline; as a matter of fact, education at any level is not compulsory. In ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 1995
Inside
 
Author Notes
Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 1995
Inside
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.02
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 1995, Vol. 4, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0403.02
In Zimbabwe, as you will read in this issue’s World View article, there are only about 20 speech-language pathologists to provide intervention services to over 10 million people. There is no educational program in our discipline; as a matter of fact, education at any level is not compulsory. In spite of this, most of the population is bilingual or trilingual. Moreover, as Wolf-Schein, Afako, and Zondo report, their phonological screening measure simultaneously screens the sounds of two African languages plus English. The assumption of multiculturalism is made at the outset, not as a “later-thought.”
Our own educational programs, often through later thinking, through experience-based learning, and through the results of investigative inquiry, when at their best, are perpetually in change. This change, at its best, is in recognition of the need and motivation to provide the finest in clinical science education and personnel preparation. Impetus for such change is reflected in numerous articles that appear in this issue.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access