The Relationship of Selected Perceptual Measures of Diadochokinesis to Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthric Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis The current experiment explored the relationship of two perceptual measures of diadochokinetic (DDK) performance to speech intelligibility in 15 men with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The perceptual measures of DDK performance took the form of scalings of articulatory precision and rhythmic consistency. Regression analyses indicated that both measures were statistically ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1995
The Relationship of Selected Perceptual Measures of Diadochokinesis to Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthric Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robin A. Samlan
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Gary Weismer
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Contact author: Gary Weismer, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, 1975 Willow Drive, University of Wisconsin—Madison, Madison, WI 53706
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Dysarthria / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1995
The Relationship of Selected Perceptual Measures of Diadochokinesis to Speech Intelligibility in Dysarthric Speakers With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 9-13. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.09
History: Received March 21, 1994 , Accepted January 31, 1995
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 9-13. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.09
History: Received March 21, 1994; Accepted January 31, 1995

The current experiment explored the relationship of two perceptual measures of diadochokinetic (DDK) performance to speech intelligibility in 15 men with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The perceptual measures of DDK performance took the form of scalings of articulatory precision and rhythmic consistency. Regression analyses indicated that both measures were statistically significant in their ability to predict scaled speech intelligibility, although the efficiency of that prediction was somewhat better for articulatory precision than for rhythmic consistency. Regressions involving articulatory precision and rhythmic consistency were also found to be statistically significant. These results are discussed in terms of the clinical significance of DDK measures, especially their potential independence (or lack thereof) from general estimates of speech severity.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported in part by NIDCD Award #DC000319.
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