Out-of-Class Versus In-Class Service Delivery in Language Intervention Effects on Communication Interactions With Young Children Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1995
Out-of-Class Versus In-Class Service Delivery in Language Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne E. Roberts
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center and Division of Speech and Hearing Sciences University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Barry Prizant
    Division of Communication Disorders Emerson College
  • R. A. McWilliam
    Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center and Division of Specialized Education Programs University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Contact author: Joanne E. Roberts, PhD, Frank Porter Graham Child Development Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 105 Smith Level Road, CB #8180, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8180
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1995
Out-of-Class Versus In-Class Service Delivery in Language Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 87-94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.87
History: Received August 2, 1993 , Accepted October 25, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 87-94. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.87
History: Received August 2, 1993; Accepted October 25, 1994

The interactions of young children and their speech-language pathologist during out-of-class and in-class language intervention were compared for 15 children with disabilities attending a mainstreamed childcare center. Children were pair matched and randomly assigned to either in-class or out-of-class special services. After 3 months, treatment sessions were videotaped. The results indicated that some, but not all, aspects of both speech-language pathologists' and children's interactions differed during in-class versus out-of-class treatment sessions. During out-of-class sessions, speech-language pathologists took more turns than during in-class sessions. Children complied more with requests during out-of-class sessions and responded less to requests during in-class sessions. The results suggest that because in-class and out-of-class models have differential effects only on some aspects of clinician and child behavior, selection of service delivery models must be determined by a myriad of factors. Furthermore, these findings suggest that, in the absence of more conclusive data, it is premature to equate a particular mode of service delivery with a higher degree of treatment efficacy.

Acknowledgments
This article was supported by a grant from the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitive Services (#H023C00056). We extend our appreciation to Dr. Donald Bailey for his contribution to this study.
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