The Performance of Younger and Older Adults With Retardation on a Series of Language Tasks Three experiments were performed with groups of persons with mild to moderate levels of retardation between the ages of 20 to 36 and 55 to 77 years. The ability of these subjects to perform language tasks with heavy processing demands was examined. These tasks included following syntactically complex directions, recalling ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1995
The Performance of Younger and Older Adults With Retardation on a Series of Language Tasks
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martin Fujiki
    Brigham Young University
  • Bonnie Brinton
    Brigham Young University
  • Contact author: Martin Fujiki, PhD, Brigham Young University, 130 TLRB, P.O. Box 28673, Provo, UT 84602-8673
Article Information
Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 1995
The Performance of Younger and Older Adults With Retardation on a Series of Language Tasks
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 77-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.77
History: Received February 7, 1994 , Accepted September 30, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 77-86. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.77
History: Received February 7, 1994; Accepted September 30, 1994

Three experiments were performed with groups of persons with mild to moderate levels of retardation between the ages of 20 to 36 and 55 to 77 years. The ability of these subjects to perform language tasks with heavy processing demands was examined. These tasks included following syntactically complex directions, recalling facts from an expository passage (fact recall), and retelling a narrative passage (story recall). The abilities of subjects in the two groups were examined and performance was compared. It was found that the performance of the subjects did not differ on two of the three tasks. The younger subjects performed significantly better than the older subjects on only the fact recall task.

Author Notes
This work was supported, in part, by Innovation Grant No. H133C00108 from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, Department of Education, awarded to the University of Kansas, Parsons Research Center, and by a research grant from the College of Education, Brigham Young University. The authors would like to thank Joseph Spradlin for comments on an earlier version of this manuscript. We would also like to thank Julie Masterson and two anonymous reviewers for their careful edits and suggestions. Additionally, we would like to express our appreciation to the following persons for their assistance in identifying subjects: Claudia Christensen, Dan Cline, Opel Clark, Linda Evans, Alberta Hall, Debbie Gates, Deborah O’Dell, Chris Rinck, Susan Stanton, Lynette Stucky-Mack, Denise Winslow, and Ric Zaharia.
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