Communication Strategies for Increasing the Integration of Persons in Supported Employment A Review Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1995
Communication Strategies for Increasing the Integration of Persons in Supported Employment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Keith Storey
    Chapman University, Concord, CA
  • Helen Ezell
    Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Linda Lengyel
    Gateways Technical Assistance Initiative, Gibsonia, PA
  • Contact author: Keith Storey, Chapman University, 2600 Stanwell Drive, Suite 110, Concord, CA 94520
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Social Communication & Pragmatics Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1995
Communication Strategies for Increasing the Integration of Persons in Supported Employment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 45-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.45
History: Received July 19, 1993 , Accepted September 2, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 45-54. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.45
History: Received July 19, 1993; Accepted September 2, 1994

Integration of workers with severe disabilities is a critical outcome of supported employment. However, in practice, integration has been difficult to achieve. Few intervention strategies have been empirically validated. This paper reviews data-based communication research designed to increase the social interactions of workers with disabilities in supported employment settings. The literature is divided into three areas for review (social skills instruction, problem solving, and nonverbal communication strategies). Nineteen articles are reviewed. Specific communication interventions for increasing integration are analyzed and evaluated with suggestions for best practice of instructional techniques. Recommendations for future research are discussed.

Author Notes
The completion of this article was supported in part by a grant (#H023N10007) from the U.S. Department of Education.
However, the opinions expressed herein do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no official endorsement should be inferred.
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