Increased Postoperative Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement in Patients With Anterior Oral Cancer Preliminary Findings and Possible Implications for Treatment Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1995
Increased Postoperative Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement in Patients With Anterior Oral Cancer
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Masako Fujiu
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Barbara Roa Pauloski
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Contact Author: Jeri A. Logemann, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208-3540
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1995
Increased Postoperative Posterior Pharyngeal Wall Movement in Patients With Anterior Oral Cancer
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 24-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.24
History: Received January 20, 1994 , Accepted October 25, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1995, Vol. 4, 24-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0402.24
History: Received January 20, 1994; Accepted October 25, 1994

Anterior bulging of the posterior pharyngeal wall (PPW) and its contact with the base of the tongue (BOT) is an essential element of the pharyngeal stage of swallowing. Postoperative changes in the extent of anterior bulge of the PPW during the pharyngeal swallow were documented in 11 oral cancer patients who underwent surgical resections of the anterior tongue and/or floor of the mouth. Seven subjects demonstrated approximately a 30% or more increase in anterior bulge of the PPW during liquid and/or paste swallows at 3 months postoperatively relative to their preoperative values. The other four subjects demonstrated no change or a decrease in anterior bulge of the PPW postoperatively. No notable increase or decrease in anterior bulge of the PPW was observed between the 3- and 6-month postoperative evaluations of the six subjects whose 6-month post-operative data were available. PPW bulge tended to increase more in subjects with poor oropharyngeal swallow efficiency, which was likely to be related to greater extent of tongue resection. These results suggest the potential for compensatory movement of the PPW when the BOT is positioned more anteriorly, and a possible treatment approach to increasing PPW contraction in dysphagic individuals with reduced BOT-to-PPW contact during the pharyngeal swallow.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by National Institute of Health Grants PO1-CA-40007 and RO1-CA-46764.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access