Examining Readiness for Learning Two-Word Utterances by Children With Specific Expressive Language Impairment Dynamic Assessment Validation Research Article
EDITOR'S AWARD
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Examining Readiness for Learning Two-Word Utterances by Children With Specific Expressive Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Bain
    Idaho State University, Pocatello
  • Lesley B. Olswang
    University of Washington, Seattle
  • Contact author: Barbara A. Bain, PhD, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Campus Box 8116, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83209
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Examining Readiness for Learning Two-Word Utterances by Children With Specific Expressive Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 81-91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.81
History: Received January 20, 1994 , Accepted August 3, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 81-91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.81
History: Received January 20, 1994; Accepted August 3, 1994

Dynamic assessment examines how children respond to cues presented hierarchically from least to most supportive. The hypothesis is that children's responsiveness reflects readiness to learn a new behavior; that is, responsiveness to the least supportive cuing indicates a readiness for immediate learning (Vygotsky, 1978). A dynamic assessment procedure was employed with 15 preschool children with specific expressive language impairment to determine their readiness for producing two-word utterances. Three types of validation were examined for the dynamic assessment procedure: construct, predictive, and concurrent. The results supported construct validity in that the subjects were able to produce more two-word utterances correctly with the more supportive cuing than they produced with the least supportive cuing. The results also supported predictive validity in that subjects who demonstrated responsiveness to the cuing hierarchy generally demonstrated greater language change during the 9-week study period than those subjects not responsive to the cuing hierarchy. The concurrent validity results revealed rather unexpected findings. In general, the subjects produced a greater variety of two-word categories and more lexical combinations during the language sample than during the dynamic assessment procedure. Clinical and theoretical implications of the results are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Deafness and other Communication Disorders, Grant #R29-DC00431, Predicting the Benefits of Treatment. The authors appreciated the constructive suggestions provided by Elizabeth Crais and two reviewers.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access