Voice Dysfunction in the Broadcasting Professional Q: To date, there is a storehouse of information on voice problems of the professional singer, but what is known about other professionals who depend on their speaking voices for their livelihood? A: Professional voice users are individuals who rely on their voices to perform job-related tasks successfully. They are ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   February 01, 1995
Voice Dysfunction in the Broadcasting Professional
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Michael S. Benninger
    Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit
  • Contact author: Michael S. Benninger, MD, Department of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery, Henry Ford Hospital, 2799 West Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI 48202-2689
Article Information
Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult   |   February 01, 1995
Voice Dysfunction in the Broadcasting Professional
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.08
History: Received September 20, 1994 , Accepted October 10, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.08
History: Received September 20, 1994; Accepted October 10, 1994
Q: To date, there is a storehouse of information on voice problems of the professional singer, but what is known about other professionals who depend on their speaking voices for their livelihood?
A: Professional voice users are individuals who rely on their voices to perform job-related tasks successfully. They are public performers, preachers, teachers, salespersons, telephone operators, aerobics instructors, receptionists, and many others who would be seriously affected in some way by prolonged loss of voice. Anecdotally, most laryngologists and voice pathologists have had frequent occasion to treat nonsingers in voice-related professions. Despite these experiences, little data are available to describe the incidence, severity, amount of disability, assessment, treatment, and outcome in these voice professionals. Included in this population are radio and television broadcasters, whose voices are highly “visible” and who continuously face the potential for scrutiny should voice dysfunction occur.
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