Vocal Fold Diadochokinetic Function of Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis This study relates over time the changes in voluntary opening and closing of the vocal folds (vocal fold diadochokinesis, or VFDDK) of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The rate, pattern, and periodicity of VFDDK were examined for 12 ALS subjects with bulbar and 14 subjects with nonbulbar signs of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 1995
Vocal Fold Diadochokinetic Function of Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Karen A. Renout
    Network North, Sudbury, Ontario
  • Herbert A. Leeper
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
  • Donna L. Bandur
    University Hospital, London, Ontario
  • Arthur J. Hudson
    University Hospital, London, Ontario
  • Contact author: Herbert A. Leeper, PhD, Department of Communicative Disorders, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario N6G 1H1
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 1995
Vocal Fold Diadochokinetic Function of Individuals With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 73-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.73
History: Received April 13, 1993 , Accepted March 23, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 73-80. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.73
History: Received April 13, 1993; Accepted March 23, 1994

This study relates over time the changes in voluntary opening and closing of the vocal folds (vocal fold diadochokinesis, or VFDDK) of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). The rate, pattern, and periodicity of VFDDK were examined for 12 ALS subjects with bulbar and 14 subjects with nonbulbar signs of the disease. The acoustical data were analyzed with a commercially available computer-based speech analysis system. ALS patients with bulbar and nonbulbar symptoms demonstrate reduced rate and aperiodic VFDDK as the symptomatology of the neuromotor system progresses. Individuals with bulbar signs show a greater change in vocal fold activity than do the nonbulbar group. Discussion of the clinical implications for initial diagnosis and monitoring of changes over time in motor control of laryngeal function is presented.

Acknowledgment
The authors would like to acknowledge the support given for portions of this investigation by the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society of Canada. Note is given to D. G. Jamieson, who commented on earlier portions of a version of the data set which were used for some segments of this manuscript.
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