Prosodic and Syntactic Bootstrapping and Their Clinical Applications A Tutorial Tutorial
Tutorial  |   February 01, 1995
Prosodic and Syntactic Bootstrapping and Their Clinical Applications
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa M. Bedore
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Laurence B. Leonard
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Contact author: Lisa Bedore, Audiology and Speech Sciences, Heavilon Hall, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907
Article Information
Tutorial
Tutorial   |   February 01, 1995
Prosodic and Syntactic Bootstrapping and Their Clinical Applications
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 66-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.66
History: Received August 2, 1993 , Accepted March 22, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 66-72. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.66
History: Received August 2, 1993; Accepted March 22, 1994

All theories of language development assume that young children must have some means of identifying the relevant units of the language they hear without explicit instruction from adults. Even if children are born fully equipped to handle abstract units such as phrases and verbs, they need some means of identifying which pieces of the speech stream are examples of these units, because such units are not structured in the same way across languages. In this paper, we discuss two solutions to this problem that children might employ, commonly referred to as "prosodic bootstrapping" and "syntactic bootstrapping." Following a discussion of these processes, their implications for language intervention are considered.

Acknowledgments
The preparation of this paper was supported in part by National Institutes of Health grant DC00458. The authors thank Lisa Goffman and the Journal reviewers for helpful comments on an earlier version of the paper.
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