A Clinical Screening Procedure for Assessing Consonant Cluster Production This paper describes a 64-item clinical screening task designed to assess the accuracy of children's consonant cluster productions. This procedure is designed to help speech-language pathologists develop intervention programs to improve children's production of clusters by facilitating the identification of error patterns. Once such patterns have been identified, individualized treatment ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 1995
A Clinical Screening Procedure for Assessing Consonant Cluster Production
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas W. Powell
    Louisiana State University Medical Center, New Orleans
  • Contact author: Thomas W. Powell, PhD, Department of Communication Disorders, LSU Medical Center, 1900 Gravier Street, New Orleans, LA 70112-2262
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 1995
A Clinical Screening Procedure for Assessing Consonant Cluster Production
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 59-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.59
History: Received February 16, 1993 , Accepted April 27, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 59-65. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.59
History: Received February 16, 1993; Accepted April 27, 1994

This paper describes a 64-item clinical screening task designed to assess the accuracy of children's consonant cluster productions. This procedure is designed to help speech-language pathologists develop intervention programs to improve children's production of clusters by facilitating the identification of error patterns. Once such patterns have been identified, individualized treatment programs designed to maximize generalization may be developed.

The task was administered to 100 4- and 5-year-old subjects to assess the technical adequacy of the procedure. Internal consistency reliability of the task was high, and the procedure was also shown to assess an appropriately diverse array of word-initial and word-final consonant clusters. Finally, the construct validity of the task was supported by factor analytic procedures.

Acknowledgments
The author would like to acknowledge the contributions of Lisa Chilcote and Pamela Allen during the data collection portion of this project. This work was funded by a Research Grant for New Investigators from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation.
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