The Influence of Familiarity on Judgments of Treated Speech Three groups of 10 naive listeners transcribed sentences produced by a dysarthric speaker. The first group (Control) transcribed sentences that the speaker read in her customary manner. A second group (Treatment) transcribed the same sentences; however, the speaker produced them while implementing a breath-group strategy that she had learned in ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 1995
The Influence of Familiarity on Judgments of Treated Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kris Tjaden
    University of Wisconsin-Madison
  • Julie M. Liss
    Arizona State University
  • Contact author: Kris Tjaden, MA, 437 Waisman Center, 1500 Highland Avenue, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, WI 53705-2280
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 1995
The Influence of Familiarity on Judgments of Treated Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 39-48. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.39
History: Received July 15, 1993 , Accepted June 29, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 39-48. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.39
History: Received July 15, 1993; Accepted June 29, 1994

Three groups of 10 naive listeners transcribed sentences produced by a dysarthric speaker. The first group (Control) transcribed sentences that the speaker read in her customary manner. A second group (Treatment) transcribed the same sentences; however, the speaker produced them while implementing a breath-group strategy that she had learned in speech treatment. A final group of listeners (Familiarization) also transcribed the sentences that were produced by the speaker as she implemented the breath-group strategy. However, this Familiarization group first listened to an audiotape of the speaker reading aloud a paragraph as they followed along with a written script. This was regarded as a familiarization procedure. Statistical analysis revealed that the Familiarization group outperformed the Treatment group, which in turn outperformed the Control group. Potential perceptual benefits resulting from the familiarization procedure are discussed, along with clinical implications.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this paper were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association National Convention, 1992, San Antonio, Texas. This investigation was supported by the Bryng Bryngelson Fund of the Department of Communication Disorders, University of Minnesota.
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