Eliciting Prespeech Vocalizations in a Young Child With Profound Hearing Loss Usefulness of Real-Time Spectrographic Speech Displays Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   February 01, 1995
Eliciting Prespeech Vocalizations in a Young Child With Profound Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer
    Indiana University School of Medicine
  • Rachel E. Stark
    Purdue University
  • Contact author: David J. Ertmer, PhD, DeVault Otologic Research Lab, Indiana University School of Medicine, RileyR esearch Wing, Room 044, 702 Barnhill, Indianapolis, IN 46202-4949
Article Information
Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   February 01, 1995
Eliciting Prespeech Vocalizations in a Young Child With Profound Hearing Loss
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 33-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.33
History: Received July 6, 1993 , Accepted March 21, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 1995, Vol. 4, 33-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0401.33
History: Received July 6, 1993; Accepted March 21, 1994

The usefulness of a real-time spectrographic speech display (SSD) in eliciting imitative and spontaneous prespeech vocalizations was explored through a case study. A 3-year, 10-month-old boy who exhibited a profound bilateral hearing loss participated in six speech training sessions. The subject received instruction that used SSD feedback to stimulate imitative production of disyllables. In addition, spontaneous vocalizations with and without SSD feedback were classified according to the developmental levels observed in infants with normal hearing (Stark, 1989). Improvement in the ability to imitate disyllables was observed. The subject also produced a higher proportion of later-developing vocalizations when using SSD feedback than when vocalizing without SSD feedback. Implications for assessment of speech development and for speech training are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This study was funded, in part, by an institutional training grant from the National Institutes of Health entitled Research Training in Communication Disorders (#5T32 DC00030). The authors wish to express their gratitude to J and his family for their participation in the study, and to Suneeti Nathani for her assistance in establishing the reliability of vocalization classifications.
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