Computer-Assisted Instruction for Learning Developmental Sentence Scoring An Experimental Comparison Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1994
Computer-Assisted Instruction for Learning Developmental Sentence Scoring
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diana L. Hughes, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders, Moore 416, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center
  • Marilyn K. Kertoy
    University of Western Ontario
  • Nickola Wolf Nelson
    Western Michigan University
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1994
Computer-Assisted Instruction for Learning Developmental Sentence Scoring
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 89-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.89
History: Received March 16, 1993 , Accepted March 22, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 89-95. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.89
History: Received March 16, 1993; Accepted March 22, 1994

The increasing availability of computer-assisted instruction is enabling both practicing clinicians and students in training to learn new analysis procedures or to relearn old ones. This study compared a classroom-based tutorial (CBT) method and a computer assisted instruction (CAI) method for learning a grammatical language analysis procedure, developmental sentence scoring (DSS). Subjects were 55 graduate students, who heard an introductory lecture and took a pretest, and were then randomly assigned to one of two groups. Students in the CBT group met with an instructor who provided explanations and corrective feedback for practice exercises for 5 weeks. Students in the CAI group used self-paced software to practice scoring the same practice exercises, with corrective feedback provided by the computer tutorial. Analysis of post-test scores revealed no significant differences between the CBT and CAI groups in scoring accuracy. Students in both groups performed at near-ceiling levels, regardless of pretest scores. This is good news for instructors who wish to devote class time to other critical language treatment issues but still wish their students to learn a valuable clinical procedure. Practicing clinicians who wish to learn DSS, or refresh DSS scoring skills learned earlier in preprofessional training programs, may also find the CAI method valuable.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to thank the following graduate students who assisted with this research: Sherry Joines, Sally Ricketson, and Andrea Behrns at Western Michigan University, and Allison Goody at the University of Western Ontario. Thanks also to the reviewers of AJSLP for their insightful comments.
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