Assessment and Intervention for Children With Limited English Proficiency and Language Disorders The number of children with limited English proficiency (LEP) in U.S. public schools is growing dramatically. Speech-language pathologists increasingly receive referrals from classroom teachers for children with limited English proficiency who are struggling in school. The speech-language pathologists are frequently asked to determine if the children have language disorders that ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   September 01, 1994
Assessment and Intervention for Children With Limited English Proficiency and Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, PhD
    Assistant Professor, Department of Communicative Disorders, University of the Pacific, 3601 Pacific Avenue, Stockton, CA 95211
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Language Disorders / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   September 01, 1994
Assessment and Intervention for Children With Limited English Proficiency and Language Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 77-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.77
History: Received January 16, 1992 , Accepted March 15, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 77-88. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.77
History: Received January 16, 1992; Accepted March 15, 1994

The number of children with limited English proficiency (LEP) in U.S. public schools is growing dramatically. Speech-language pathologists increasingly receive referrals from classroom teachers for children with limited English proficiency who are struggling in school. The speech-language pathologists are frequently asked to determine if the children have language disorders that may be causing or contributing to their academic difficulties. Most speech-language pathologists are monolingual English speakers who have had little or no coursework or training related to the needs of LEP children. This article discusses practical, clinically applicable ideas for assessment and treatment of LEP children who are language impaired, and gives suggestions for distinguishing language differences from language disorders in children with limited English proficiency.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank several graduates of the University of the Pacific’s Department of Communicative Disorders. Andrea Bennett, Melissa McNutt, and Deborah Garfield assisted in completing this manuscript. Julie Urquidez added insight and information regarding issues surrounding the assessment and treatment of linguistically and culturally diverse children. In addition, I acknowledge Li-Rong Lilly Cheng and Henriette Langdon for their knowledge and inspiration, which have been of great help to me. Finally, the editorial assistance of Nickola Wolf Nelson was greatly appreciated.
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