Defining and Remediating Persistent Lateral Lisps in Children Using Electropalatography Preliminary Findings Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1994
Defining and Remediating Persistent Lateral Lisps in Children Using Electropalatography
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul A. Dagenais, PhD
    University of South Alabama, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, 2000 University Commons, Mobile, AL 36608–0002
  • Paula Critz-Crosby
    University of Alabama at Birmingham
  • June B. Adams
    Birmingham Public Schools
  • Appreciation is extended to EPIC School, a part of the Birmingham Public Schools, for their cooperation in this project. Thanks are extended to Sherry Sutphin for manufacturing and repairing pseudopalates, and to Stephen Smith and Donna Neff for development and maintenance of software and hardware systems.
    Appreciation is extended to EPIC School, a part of the Birmingham Public Schools, for their cooperation in this project. Thanks are extended to Sherry Sutphin for manufacturing and repairing pseudopalates, and to Stephen Smith and Donna Neff for development and maintenance of software and hardware systems.×
    Portions of this study were presented at the 1990 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, Seattle, WA.
    Portions of this study were presented at the 1990 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Convention, Seattle, WA.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1994
Defining and Remediating Persistent Lateral Lisps in Children Using Electropalatography
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 67-76. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.67
History: Received July 14, 1992 , Accepted March 22, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 67-76. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.67
History: Received July 14, 1992; Accepted March 22, 1994

Electropalatography (EPG) was used to train two 8-year-old girls with persistent lateral lisps. Pretreatment evaluations showed that the two speakers differed in the manner in which they produced lisps. Subject 1, who produced errors for /s/ and /z/ sounds only, produced these errors with linguapalatal closure across the alveolar ridge and no contact at the region of the molars. She remediated quickly (17 treatment sessions) and could produce correct productions in conversation when monitored. Subject 2 produced errors for the alveolar sibilants, the palatal sibilants, and the affricates. She produced these errors with linguapalatal contacts along the alveolar processes using a midline groove similar to that used for palatal sibilants. A rounded tongue configuration was suspected to occur that allowed for midline air passage as well as air passage through the buccal cavities. Subject 2 made minimal gains after 28 treatment sessions. Possible causes for the different performances of the two subjects are discussed.

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