Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders Evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders or dysphagia is a relatively new part of the field of speech-language pathology, having developed largely in the last 20 years into a significant part of daily practice for speech-language pathologists. The number of speech-language pathologists currently evaluating and treating patients with dysphagia has ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   September 01, 1994
Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeri A. Logemann, PhD
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery and Neurology, Northwestern University, 2299 North Campus Drive, Evanston, IL 60208
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Viewpoint: Speech-Language Pathology Moving Toward the 21st Century
Viewpoint   |   September 01, 1994
Evaluation and Treatment of Swallowing Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 41-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.41
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 41-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.41
Evaluation and treatment of swallowing disorders or dysphagia is a relatively new part of the field of speech-language pathology, having developed largely in the last 20 years into a significant part of daily practice for speech-language pathologists. The number of speech-language pathologists currently evaluating and treating patients with dysphagia has grown to approximately 42% of the speech-language pathology members of ASHA (1988 ASHA Omnibus Survey). A recent survey of speech-language pathologists at 46 Illinois medical centers, having at least 150 combined hospital and extended care beds and listed in the 1990 edition of the American Hospital Association Directory, showed that the mean percentage of the caseload devoted to dysphagia was 54.35%, with a median of 57%. This was the most frequent disorder in the caseload, followed by aphasia, with a mean of 44.15% and a median of 40 (Connelly & Goldacker, 1992). It might be anticipated that by the year 2000 the majority of speech language pathologists working in health care will be evaluating and treating swallowing disorders, as will a number of those in the public schools dealing with children with neurologic and other organic disorders.
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