Rehabilitation Following Traumatic Brain Injury Where Are We Going? Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   September 01, 1994
Rehabilitation Following Traumatic Brain Injury
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Brenda L. B. Adamovich, PhD
    Regional Rehabilitation Center, Pitt County Memorial Hospital, University Medical Center of Eastern Carolina, 200 Statonsburg Road, P.O. Box 6028, Greenville, NC 27834–6028
Article Information
Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Traumatic Brain Injury / Viewpoint: Speech-Language Pathology Moving Toward the 21st Century
Viewpoint   |   September 01, 1994
Rehabilitation Following Traumatic Brain Injury
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 39-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.39
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 39-41. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.39
The most significant development of specialized rehabilitation programs for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) has occurred over the past 15 years. A lot has happened during this relatively short period. The National Head Injury Foundation was formed and has expanded to include chapters in almost every state. Members of this organization have successfully lobbied to increase recognition of, and funding for, services for people who have suffered a traumatic brain injury. The number of specialized programs for patients with traumatic brain injury has grown from a handful of programs to almost 1,000 programs across the United States. The quality of care in general has improved from lifetime nursing home placements to programs that focus on home and community re-entry with emphasis on metacognitive skills, functional gains, and empowerment.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access