Emerging and Future Issues in Motor Speech Disorders Motor speech disorders (MSDs) include the dysarthrias and apraxia of speech, neurologically-based problems that can be congenital or acquired;; static, improving, or worsening in their course; associated with pathology in multiple areas of the nervous system; caused by a wide variety of diseases. Discussing MSDs, relative to the future, ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   September 01, 1994
Emerging and Future Issues in Motor Speech Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph R. Duffy, PhD
    Head, Section of Speech Pathology, Mayo Clinic (E-8A), 200 First Street, SW, Rochester, MN 55905
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Practice Management / Viewpoint: Speech-Language Pathology Moving Toward the 21st Century
Viewpoint   |   September 01, 1994
Emerging and Future Issues in Motor Speech Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 36-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.36
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 36-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.36
Motor speech disorders (MSDs) include the dysarthrias and apraxia of speech, neurologically-based problems that can be congenital or acquired;; static, improving, or worsening in their course; associated with pathology in multiple areas of the nervous system; caused by a wide variety of diseases. Discussing MSDs, relative to the future, is justified on the following grounds.
For example, in our Section of Speech Pathology at the Mayo Clinic, MSDs are the primary communication problem in over one-third of the patients with acquired disease of any kind. Furthermore, MSDs account for over 50% of the primary communication disorder diagnoses in people with acquired neuropathologies.
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