RE: Articles on Auditory Integration Training, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 3(2) Students, primarily speech-language pathology majors, have expressed interest and excitement in auditory integration training (AIT). Forty-one pages of AJSLP are devoted to this subject in the May 1994 issue. I am concerned but not surprised about the virtually total absence of a scientific base for AIT and its application to ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   September 01, 1994
RE: Articles on Auditory Integration Training, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 3(2)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Maurice H. Miller
    New York University School of Education
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   September 01, 1994
RE: Articles on Auditory Integration Training, American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, 3(2)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 105-106. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.105
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1994, Vol. 3, 105-106. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0303.105
Students, primarily speech-language pathology majors, have expressed interest and excitement in auditory integration training (AIT). Forty-one pages of AJSLP are devoted to this subject in the May 1994 issue.
I am concerned but not surprised about the virtually total absence of a scientific base for AIT and its application to autistic persons and those with other disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity syndrome, tinnitus, dyslexia, severe depression. Words such as "miracle" and "total cure" are sprinkled through some of these articles by AIT’s supporters.
The determination of candidacy for this approach is based primarily on "peaks" and "valleys" in the pure-tone audiometric curve, which are interpreted to reflect hypersensitivity to certain sounds. Veale (1994)  stated that peaks of 10 dB or more between adjacent frequencies are interpreted as "distortions" in hearing, or hyperacusis, and that "Differences in the hearing response of the two ears may indicate auditory processing deficits" (p. 12). The basis for determining the interaural difference is not reported. Is it a 5-dB difference for pure-tone thresholds? At how many frequencies should it occur? Apparently the 10-dB criterion for candidacy is not always applied. Monville and Nelson (1994)  define hyperacusis peaks as thresholds at least 5 dB better than adjacent frequencies.
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