Pretreatment and Posttreatment Speech Naturalness Ratings of Adults With Mild and Severe Stuttering Speech naturalness of adults who stutter was assessed before and after enrollment in the Precision Fluency Shaping Program. Sixty-four naive raters used a nine-point speech naturalness scale developed by Martin, Haroldson, and Triden (1984)  to rate the speech of five adults with mild stuttering and five adults with severe stuttering. ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1994
Pretreatment and Posttreatment Speech Naturalness Ratings of Adults With Mild and Severe Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joseph Kalinowski, PhD
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
    Dalhousie University, 5599 Fenwick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H–1R2, Canada
  • Sandra Noble
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Joy Armson
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Andrew Stuart
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1994
Pretreatment and Posttreatment Speech Naturalness Ratings of Adults With Mild and Severe Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 61-66. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.61
History: Received June 16, 1993 , Accepted January 25, 1994
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 61-66. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.61
History: Received June 16, 1993; Accepted January 25, 1994

Speech naturalness of adults who stutter was assessed before and after enrollment in the Precision Fluency Shaping Program. Sixty-four naive raters used a nine-point speech naturalness scale developed by Martin, Haroldson, and Triden (1984)  to rate the speech of five adults with mild stuttering and five adults with severe stuttering. The raters assessed 10 1-minute audio samples of clients reading prepared text. Samples were acquired during both pre- and posttreatment assessment. Posttreatment samples were either nearly or completely stutter-free. Posttreatment speech was rated as significantly more unnatural than pretreatment speech for both groups of speakers. This study supports the notion that the reduction of stuttering does not necessarily result in an increase in speech naturalness, and suggests that the goal of treatment should be to produce speech that is both perceptually fluent and natural-sounding.

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