Is Theory Better Than Chicken Soup? We are in general agreement with much of what Sandy Friel-Patti (Friel-Patti, 1994) and Judy S. Gravel (Gravel, 1994) write in their invited responses to our paper, The effects of auditory integration training on autism. Our paper, based on the testing of 445 autistic children and adults, reports the findings ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   May 01, 1994
Is Theory Better Than Chicken Soup?
 
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Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   May 01, 1994
Is Theory Better Than Chicken Soup?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 38-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.38
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 38-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.38
We are in general agreement with much of what Sandy Friel-Patti (Friel-Patti, 1994) and Judy S. Gravel (Gravel, 1994) write in their invited responses to our paper, The effects of auditory integration training on autism. Our paper, based on the testing of 445 autistic children and adults, reports the findings from our second study of AIT in autism. (The first study is in press.)
Frankly, we have been surprised and pleased by the generally favorable attention—appropri-ately tempered by skepticism—that has been afforded to AIT by colleagues around the world. The thoughtful and provocative comments by Friel-Patti and Gravel that stimulated our response represent the kind of debate we find most challenging and useful.
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