Commitment to Theory In summary, authors Rimland, Edelson, and Veale are to be commended for bringing the topic of auditory integration training forward for professional review and debate. AIT offers an excellent forum for consideration of the role of theory in intervention for clinicians engaged in treatment of persons with communication disorders. Each ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   May 01, 1994
Commitment to Theory
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandy Friel-Patti, PhD
    University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   May 01, 1994
Commitment to Theory
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 30-34. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.30
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1994, Vol. 3, 30-34. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0302.30

In summary, authors Rimland, Edelson, and Veale are to be commended for bringing the topic of auditory integration training forward for professional review and debate. AIT offers an excellent forum for consideration of the role of theory in intervention for clinicians engaged in treatment of persons with communication disorders. Each clinician must take a step back on occasion and face the question about treatment efficacy from an objective, data-driven perspective. Such public discussion of AIT as intervention inevitably leads to reexamination of what is meant by success/failure in treatment; indeed, what constitutes intervention itself. AIT is being held up to the scrutiny of both the clinical and research communities, and, if it is valid, it will withstand such inquiry and will even advance our understanding of some very perplexing disorders. In order for that to happen, responsible researchers and clinicians must be willing to shed biases, ask questions, conduct studies, and report them to their professional community of peer reviewers. The process is vital for every speech, language, and hearing professional and for the persons with communication disorders they serve.

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