A Sequential Analysis of Children's Responsiveness to Parental Print References During Shared Book-Reading Interactions Adults reading to preschool children have been encouraged to use print references (e.g., questions and comments about print) to stimulate children's interactions with written language. This study used sequential analysis (Bakeman & Gottman, 1997) to determine the extent to which typically developing preschoolers were responsive to parental print references during ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2002
A Sequential Analysis of Children's Responsiveness to Parental Print References During Shared Book-Reading Interactions
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura M. Justice, PhD
    University of Virginia, Charlottesville
  • Sarah E. Weber
    The Ohio State University, Columbus
  • Helen K. Ezell
    Pittsburgh, PA
  • Roger Bakeman
    Georgia State University, Atlanta
  • Contact author: Laura Justice, PhD, Communication Disorders Program, University of Virginia, 2205 Fontaine Ave, Suite 202, Charlottesville, VA 22908. E-mail: lmj2t@virginia.edu
  • 1 These authors were affiliated with Ohio University during data collection activities.
    These authors were affiliated with Ohio University during data collection activities.×
Article Information
Development / Normal Language Processing / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2002
A Sequential Analysis of Children's Responsiveness to Parental Print References During Shared Book-Reading Interactions
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2002, Vol. 11, 30-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/004)
History: Received January 15, 2001 , Accepted June 13, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2002, Vol. 11, 30-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2002/004)
History: Received January 15, 2001; Accepted June 13, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 45

Adults reading to preschool children have been encouraged to use print references (e.g., questions and comments about print) to stimulate children's interactions with written language. This study used sequential analysis (Bakeman & Gottman, 1997) to determine the extent to which typically developing preschoolers were responsive to parental print references during a shared book-reading interaction using a rhyming book. Participants included 15 parents and their preschool children (mean age = 4 years 6 months). A single shared reading ession was collected for each dyad following parental instruction in print-referencing behaviors. Results indicated that children responded at an overall rate of 60% to parental print references but that differential levels of child responsiveness occurred as a function of parental utterance type. That is, parental prompts were significantly more likely to elicit child responses than parental comments were. Results also indicated that children's responsiveness did not vary as a function of the early literacy topic of parental print references. For instance, children were no more likely to respond to prompts addressing alphabet knowledge than those addressing book-reading concepts or word awareness. Results may help guide intervention planning for children exhibiting low levels of early literacy skill.

Acknowledgment
This project was supported in part by a Student-Initiated Research Grant in Early Childhood Language from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Foundation (the Arlene Matkin Memorial Fund) to the first author and an Ohio University Student Enhancement Award to the first and second authors.
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