Narration Abilities of Children With Language-Learning Disabilities in Response to Oral and Written Stimuli The purpose of the present investigation was to examine story retelling and inference abilities in children with language-learning disabilities (LLD). There were 10 children in the LLD group and 20 who showed normal acquisition of language, 10 of whom were matched for chronological age (NACA) and 10 of whom were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   August 01, 2001
Narration Abilities of Children With Language-Learning Disabilities in Response to Oral and Written Stimuli
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather Harris Wright, PhD
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • Marilyn Newhoff
    The University of Georgia, Athens
  • *Currently affiliated with the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY
    Currently affiliated with the University of Kentucky in Lexington, KY×
  • **Currently affiliated with San Diego State University in San Diego, CA
    Currently affiliated with San Diego State University in San Diego, CA×
  • Contact author: Heather Harris Wright, PhD, The University of Kentucky, Division of Communication Disorders, 1030 S. Broadway, Suite 5, Lexington, KY 40504.
    Contact author: Heather Harris Wright, PhD, The University of Kentucky, Division of Communication Disorders, 1030 S. Broadway, Suite 5, Lexington, KY 40504.×
  • Corresponding author: E-mail: hhwrig2@pop.uky.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   August 01, 2001
Narration Abilities of Children With Language-Learning Disabilities in Response to Oral and Written Stimuli
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 308-319. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/027)
History: Received January 14, 2000 , Accepted April 23, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 308-319. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/027)
History: Received January 14, 2000; Accepted April 23, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 16

The purpose of the present investigation was to examine story retelling and inference abilities in children with language-learning disabilities (LLD). There were 10 children in the LLD group and 20 who showed normal acquisition of language, 10 of whom were matched for chronological age (NACA) and 10 of whom were matched for language ability (NALA) to an LLD child. Stimuli were both orally presented (Heard Condition) and read silently (Read Condition) by the participants. Four stories were presented in each of these conditions. After each story, participants completed two tasks: retelling the story and answering questions that were either factual or that required inferencing. Generally, results indicated that children with LLD and NALA retold stories and drew inferences more poorly than NACA children regardless of stimulus presentation mode; children with LLD drew inferences best with orally presented stimuli; and children with NACA and NALA drew inferences best with stimuli presented in writing. A number of possible explanations for the differences between groups are discussed, including working memory and attending to relevant information in text, both of which are skills needed for reading comprehension. These children's difficulties in making inferences were attributed to impairments in cognitive functions. Clinically, then, teaching children with LLD to make inferences from both text and oral narratives would address impaired cognitive functions and reading comprehension abilities.

Author Note
We are grateful to Cynthia Johnson, Don Robin, and the three anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on earlier versions of this manuscript. We wish to thank Clark County schools and all the children who participated in this project. Portions of this study were presented at the 1996 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Conference, Seattle, WA and the 1998 Symposium on Research in Child Language Disorders, Madison, WI.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access