Case Studies of Children Using Fast ForWord We report five case studies in which the children were enrolled in Fast ForWord (FFW). The purpose of the case studies was twofold: (a) to obtain independent objective data with the commercially available computer-based language intervention program, FFW; and (b) to identify patterns of performance with FFW related to the ... Clinical Forum
Clinical Forum  |   August 01, 2001
Case Studies of Children Using Fast ForWord
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandy Friel-Patti, PhD
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Kim DesBarres
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Linda Thibodeau
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas
  • Contact author: Sandy Friel-Patti, PhD, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235.
    Contact author: Sandy Friel-Patti, PhD, Callier Center for Communication Disorders, The University of Texas at Dallas, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235.×
  • Corresponding author: e-mail: sfp@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Clinical Forum: Fast ForWord
Clinical Forum   |   August 01, 2001
Case Studies of Children Using Fast ForWord
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 203-215. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/019)
History: Received April 10, 2000 , Accepted June 29, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 203-215. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/019)
History: Received April 10, 2000; Accepted June 29, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 25

We report five case studies in which the children were enrolled in Fast ForWord (FFW). The purpose of the case studies was twofold: (a) to obtain independent objective data with the commercially available computer-based language intervention program, FFW; and (b) to identify patterns of performance with FFW related to the children's pre-intervention language profiles. Five children (3 boys, 2 girls) between the ages of 5;10 and 9;2 (years; months) enrolled in a private school for children with language-learning difficulties participated. Outcome measures included both standard scores from general tests of language and measures taken from language-sample analyses. There were modest changes in standardized measures of language after experience with FFW for 3 of the 5 children using the criterion of 95 % confidence interval. There were no clinically significant changes in language sample measures. Several interesting patterns of response to FFW intervention are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The research reported here was partially supported by a grant awarded to the first author from the Excellence in Education Fund through The University of Texas at Dallas Callier Center for Communication Disorders. We also acknowledge the cooperation of Scientific Learning Corporation for the research license awarded to the families of our participants. We are grateful to Fereshteh Kunkel, Leslie Martin, Julia McBrayne, Lana McMillian Britt, Jack Scott, and Stephanie Taylor for their assistance in data collection and language-sample transcriptions. Lana McMillian Britt was supported by the Clark Foundation Summer Research Participation Program during data collection. We acknowledge the cooperation of administration and teachers at The Shelton School in Dallas, Texas. We have benefited from many lively discussions with Marsha Zlatin Laufer, whose insights have been invaluable. Finally, we are most appreciative of the cooperation of the families and children who agreed to participate in our study. The demands of a daily intervention program lasting 6 weeks were willingly accepted by our participants and their busy parents.
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